Dog Booties Review

Adventure dog with dog booties indoors

First of all, do dogs actually need dog booties? As with many things, it depends on your dog’s breed, their age and the status of their health. Whether they need them is debatable, but if you do buy them, focus on fit. Booties should not rub on the paws and, to be effective,  need to stay on the paws.

Two times you might consider using dog boots are Winter and for hiking. In both cases, dog booties should be used judiciously as, like people’s feet, a dog’s paws benefit from time on the ground. So, if you’re taking your dog for a walk over a longer or rougher distance, maybe leave them unshod on the way out and put the booties on for the trip back.

Color of the Dog Booties indicates size

Dog Booties (not a great company name, in my opinion, too generic) make relatively inexpensive booties of varying weights. Their water-resistant 1000 Denier Cordura booties are (obviously) heavier than the 500 Denier, and will hold up better on sidewalks, streets or rough terrain. The 500 will last longer than the 330.

Measuring your dog’s paws is important in finding the right fit and, like people’s hands, the paws can be of differing sizes. Since the booties are sold individually, this makes it easy to get the right size for your particular adventure dog.

Dog Booties protect you adventure dogs paws for Winter and or hiking

Of course, it’s most important to find dog boots that stay on – the VELSTRETCH® Brand Fastener has stretch built-in and the tension can be adjusted for the best fit. Their booties are wider at the top, which allows them to be put on easily, while the fastener keeps them on.

I wish these dog booties were waterproof. That’s really the only con to these boots that I can think of.

Dog Bootie doggy dance

Made in U.S. and costing $3 per bootie, these are an inexpensive insurance policy to protect your adventure dog’s paws. The initial comical doggie dance after them first being put on is just a great bonus.

 


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